The EvE Methodology (Effort vs. Effectiveness)

Marietta — The EvE methodology is something I developed myself during a difficult and challenging project implementation for a large technology firm with a fast-growing Internet startup customer with huge hurdles to overcome.

I coined it, “Effort versus Effectiveness,” or EvE because we had over 100 tasks to accomplish in less than 48 hours! So I had the teams list the highest priority items in groups of ten. Then we took the TOP 10 and accomplished the top three first, then reshuffled the remaining seven until we were done, then moved on to the next ten items.  We got it done on time and under budget. Have you heard the age-old rhetorical question, “How do you eat an elephant?” The answer is: “One bite at a time.” If you feel overwhelmed by lots of tasks and not enough time to complete everything, try the EvE method: Prioritize, Reshuffle, “Do It” and Move On to the next task list. efficiency-wordcloud

The 2 Things that GE Looks for in Key Employees

Kennesaw, GA – GE (www.ge.com) was a great Fortune 500 company long before Jack Welch took over as CEO in 1981.  The GE brand has continued to flourish because people are seen as its most valuable asset. Why do other companies routinely select GE senior managers to come run their organizations?  Because at its core, GE leverages these two talents of key employees: critical thinking and effective communication.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/features/corporate-dossier/susan-peters-on-how-ge-churns-out-world-class-business-leaders/articleshow/25770610.cms

GE Logo

Encourage excellence today and help others with improving their critical thinking and effective communication.

Simplicity

Kennesaw – A quick shout out to my friend, Butch Adams, who gave me some great insight on simplicity last week.  When I started work at GE in Cincinnati, there was a sign over the door that simply said,

“Speed, Simplicity, Self-confidence”.

http://hbr.org/1989/09/speed-simplicity-self-confidence-an-interview-with-jack-welch/ar/1

Our environment today benefits those who can quickly act, react and be decisive.  Not only in business but in most areas of our lives.  Take a minute and click on the link above and read the Harvard Business Review article with Jack Welch, former CEO of GE and see why he was such a visionary leader.  Oh, and by way, this concept is not exactly a new one.  Leonardo da Vinci  who died in 1519, penned, “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication”.  It’s truer now than ever.

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